News

Bookmark and Share

An Opioid Remedy That Works: Treat Pain And Addiction At The Same Time

1/8/2018

An Opioid Remedy That Works: Treat Pain And Addiction At The Same Time

John Daley

Colorado Public Radio via The Washington Post

8 January 2018



Seven years ago, Robert Kerley, who makes his living as a truck driver, was loading drywall when a gust of wind knocked him off the trailer. Kerley fell 14 feet and hurt his back.



For pain, a series of doctors prescribed him a variety of opioids: Vicodin, Percocet and OxyContin.



In less than a year, the 45-year-old from Federal Heights, Colo., said he was hooked. “I spent most of my time high, laying on the couch, not doing nothing, falling asleep everywhere,” he said.



Kerley lost weight. He lost his job. His relationships with his wife and kids suffered. He remembers when he hit rock bottom: One night hanging out in a friend’s basement, he drank three beers, and the alcohol reacted with an opioid.



“I was taking so much morphine that I [experienced] respiratory arrest,” Kerley said. “I stopped breathing.”



An ambulance arrived, and EMTs administered the overdose reversal drug naloxone. Kerley was later hospitalized. As the father of a 12-year-old boy, he knew he needed to turn things around. That’s when he signed up for Kaiser Permanente‘s integrated pain service. (Kaiser Health News is not affiliated with Kaiser Permanente.)



“After seven years of being on narcotics and in a spiral downhill, the only thing that pulled me out of it was going to this class,” he said. “The only thing that pulled me out of it was doing and working the program that they ask you to work.”



The program he refers to is an eight-week course, available to Kaiser Permanente members in Colorado for $100. It’s designed to educate high-risk opioid patients about pain management. A recent class met at Kaiser’s Rock Creek medical offices in Lafayette, Colo., a town east of Boulder. Will Gersch, a clinical pharmacy specialist, taught several patients learning to battle addiction the science behind prescription drugs.



“So, basically the overarching message here is the higher the dose of the opioids, the higher the risk,” he told the group, as he jotted numbers on a whiteboard. “If you’re over these two doses, that’s a risk factor.”



Upstairs, Gersch’s colleague Amanda Bye, a clinical psychologist, highlighted a key element of the program: It’s integrated. For patient care, there’s a doctor, a clinical pharmacist, two mental health therapists, a physical therapist and a nurse — all on one floor. Patients can meet with this team, either all at once or in groups, but they do not have to deal with a series of referrals and appointments in different facilities. A spokesperson for Kaiser Permanente said researchers tracked more than 80 patients over the course of a year and found the group’s emergency room visits decreased 25 percent. Inpatient admissions dropped 40 percent, and patients’ opioid use went way down.



“We brought in all these specialists. We all know the up-to-date research of what’s most effective in helping to manage pain,” Bye said. “And that’s how the program got started.”



Bye said the team helps patients use alternatives like exercise, meditation, acupuncture and mindfulness. Some patients, though, do need to go to the chemical dependency unit for medication-assisted treatment for their opioid addiction. Benjamin Miller is an expert on integrated care with the national foundation Well Being Trust. Kaiser is on the right track, he said…

 

Read the entire article here

Bookmark and Share